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Adobo in Pandesal

Another Filipino staple, Adobo just like Pandesal has many versions depending on the region the cook comes from. I remember we had this helper, Manang whatever who adds 4 pieces of fresh calamansi juice in the adobo after cooking. The only problem is, she keeps half of the adobo for her and her niece so i barely get to eat it sometimes. The flavor of the cooked vinegar coupled with the sourness of the calamansi cuts the fat from the chicken skin. Another version is with tanglad or lemon grass, coconut milk and chilli (siling labuyo), but my family's favorite is the slightly sweet version, with the bay leaf and crushed black pepper.

Leftover adobo is good for fried rice and for filling your pandesal or soft bun dough. The vinegar acts as a preservative so you do not need to refrigerate the filled adobo buns, actually you may add a bit of five spice powder to this, thicken it with a teaspoon of cornstarch and that can be your asado filling for siopao or dumplings.



ADOBO FILLING, THICKENED WITH CORNSTARCH AND SHREDDED TO REMOVE THE BONES. COOK AND COOL BEFORE USING.













Fill the rounded dough, seal the edges.



DREDGE IN BREADCRUMBS, PROOF UNTIL YOU GET THE DESIRED HEIGHT. I GOT A REQUEST THAT THIS BATCH BE MADE EXTRA FLUFFY SO I AM EXTENDING THE PROOFING.

CHECKING THE CRUST, USING A HIGHER TEMPERATURE FOR THIS 60 GRAM PANDESAL, 350 F INSTEAD OF MY USUAL 325 F.

Notice how the open the grain structure of the crumb is, but take a look at the crust, some overproofed pandesal or breads sink or collapse once they cool, others even become wrinkly, despite an extended proof, this batch did not collapse. Honestly, i ate two of this while they were hot, and so did my mother. I will create a slide of this batch when i get the time...

Comments

Anonymous said…
Wow this is a great idea. I just made my very first pandesal yesterday and it was a huge success! It wasn't very fluffy though compared to what was sold in the Philippines.

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