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THE FINE PRINT OF PROOFING

If you already have a copy of the ebook then you probably have read some of the things here, proofing is not judged by the time although we normally use the clock to know where we are at when we are proofing doughs, and to set the timer when we need to check on the dough etc.,

If only we can all have one of those proofing cabinets with built in timers and thermostats right? but not. First off, they are expensive. If i am selling Pandesal in my neighborhood, like most Filipinos do since Magellan stepped in Cebu, why bother? If you plan to operate like Goldilock's and the French Baker, then you might need to get one of those huge Proofers. I have seen one on sale here for at least a thousand dollars which is not bad considering it can fit 24 half sheet pans. Back home, one of my students bought a metal, not aluminum fabricated proofing cabinet and it looks bad from the outside, way much worst on the inside because of the rusting.

I was thinking she could have just asked someone to make her one, you cannot put food inside a rusty container even if the dough is not in contact with the rust. The steam she used to warm the cabinet naturally created the rust over time, just not the way to do it.

Now how long does it really take to proof doughs? Depends on your formula, your kitchen's temp and humidity, the way you mixed the dough, your ingredients, etc etc. I merely just look at it. I am way past the stage of pressing and sizing. Below are photos of the Pandesal proofing stages which i think will be helpful to those who are just starting.

If you have done all the steps right, mixing, etc., and failed to proof at the correct stage, then even if you use a bread improver which is actually a softener and dough conditioner for the No Time dough method of mixing, your bread will be tough. Do not bake the dough if they are not ready yet or the bread will be dry and heavy and most likely good enough to eat only when it is warm.










Photos are taken in East Brunswick at my friend's house Dina Sanchez when i dropped by to visit. We used her 5 quart Kitchen Aid to bake two batches of 500 gram doughs. Judging from the photos, you can more or less see how the dough progresses from small to its final size just before they hit the oven. I did not use the timer, but yes we looked at the clock just to know what time it is. It was 70 F in her kitchen and this one took long to proof but not that long compared to my kitchen in New York which is at least 63 F.

Do not laugh but my nephews wear shorts and shirts at this temperature.
What is it with these kids nowadays? Maybe it is the games they play. I shake in cold while they play in shorts. Not fair.

Looks like i may be going home earlier than planned, probably around late August and not October. Perfect! This gives me time to make the gumpaste flowers for my niece's 18th birthday cake, the cupcakes (2 50 tier stands are waiting for me), do the stuff i have to do and still make time to teach breads and cake decorating. See you guys!

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