Skip to main content

2 kilograms of Whole Wheat Pandesal


SOME OF THE DOUGH PROOFING INSIDE THE OVEN WITH THE PILOT LIGHT ON.

Got to use some of the this Whole Wheat Flour i got from the Pennsylvannia Amish Store in New Jersey last March so i took it upon myself to tell my friend Anabelle that we would be making half a kilogram of Pandesal on her visit.

Half a kilogram gone in just half a day, my nephews were asking if there were some more left the following day but i had to send Anabelle home with about 7 pieces, upon my insistence of course (nobody goes home from our house without a bag of bread if we have some). She ate 5 on the spot while the breads were still warm with coco jam my mother just brought from the Philippines. It was fun, she came over to look at the mixer although i felt sad thinking she would somehow like it eventually and buy the mixer altogether.:(

Anyway i promised the boys and my Mother i will make them 2 kilograms of the same bread formula before i leave for Manila, and so i did, videotaping the whole thing with Marc my nephew. I was even surprised hearing from Marc that he wanted me to teach him how to, with John (who already knows some basic baking) helping out as well. Hey, if these guys are out to help me, i am up for it anytime...


I would sorely miss this mixer if Anabelle decides to buy it, it kinda grew on me after spending heavy lifting times with the huge bowl (so big i think i could fit my tiny body in it). Some of this bread will go to my sister to Manhattan, the rest will be frozen of course.

Dough almost done, at this stage i will remove them from the oven, preheat it at 325 F for about 15 minutes and bake them until golden brown. This dough is made with brown sugar so it will naturally darken fast.

I want to show you what happens when you prick the dough when it is fully proofed, the dough collapses and deflates naturally. My thumb caught the corner dough because i was busy chatting with my mother while i was pulling the trays off the oven.

See the photo below to compare what it would look like when it is baked, still incredibly edible of course but a tad bit different from its neighbors.

Just like a true show and tell, the front corner bread is smaller than its cousins, no visible signs of torture but you can see the slightly rough top crust. Who cares right?

Baking the first two trays. Boy, was i glad i shipped some plancha (baking sheets) through Johnny Air when i left, they came very handy when you make big batches such as this one.

Using my baker's rack to cool them a bit, although you should use a rack to stop the steam from collecting at the bottom, i already stored mine at the basement so i will probably flip this bread, that's bread clearly not bird.

Below is a photo of the inside crumb, nice and fluffy, slightly nutty and sweet from the brown sugar, there is such a thing as heaven on earth and if this wasn't that, what is?

Got any questions for me, shoot!

Not a week warm, i have been asked by my niece, two nephews and a brother the ubiquitous question, "when are you going to bake"? uugh. Still reeling from the bad airplane food (wonder if i could bring my own), i was not consciously looking forward to it yet, but had to after the 15th and still counting.. I swear my niece is probably pre-programmed to ask me that question. Fine, let's get to it then.

Perks of being a baker, you will be sorely missed and not be "kulang sa pansin" :)

Next post will be about the latest prices of baking supplies from my favorite local supplier, will write down the list of the basic ingredients so you will have an idea at the least. I am pleasantly surprised to find some ingredients staying cheap still. Not bad at all.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

3rd Class Flour, What's It All About

For starters i cannot make this Hard Monay if i did not bring any 3rd class flour or soft weak flour to New York. Once i ran out of 3rd class and tried Cake Flour, it turned bad, do not even think of using All Purpose, it will be soft but not chewy as this one made with yes, 3rd class indeed. So third class is hard to find here in the US if you will use that term. You have to say or look for soft wheat flour, that's it, not hard wheat flour, not cake or All purpose but something in between these two. It is easy to find in the Phil., just ask your local bakery suppliers and they know it is Tercera. Tercera is not for bread, bakers use it basically for cookies, cakes and other pastries, but we bakers know how to create bread recipes using part of this flour with the bread flour or hard wheat flour. It makes a softer version of any of your fave breads, with a cheaper price tag. Plus if i own a bakery, i get to use the third class for my cakes and cookies, lowering my food cost i…

HOW TO MAKE A PUDDING, PINOY STYLE

ANY LEFTOVER BREADS, DRIED BREADS AS LONG AS THEY HAVE NO MOLDS IN THEM, YOU CAN USE THESE TO MAKE YOUR HOMESTYLE PUDDING.


MOIST BUT NOT DENSE, I MAKE THIS FOR MY MOTHER SINCE SHE LIKES SOFT FOODS AND SHE CANNOT CHEW ON THE CRUSTY BREADS AND COOKIES I REGULARLY BAKE. GOOD THING WE HAVE LEFTOVERS!!!! NO NUTS PLEASE!!!!

A GOOD PUDDING IS MADE USING A BAIN MARIE, PLACE THE PUDDING PAN ON A LARGER BAKING PAN WITH WATER AT THE BOTTOM. STEAM BAKE FOR 40 MINUTES OR UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN.

DO NOT FORGET TO GREASE THE BAKING DISH OR THE PUDDING WILL STICK A LITTLE, YOU WANT NICE CLEAN CUTS...


THE PUDDING PLACED ON A SQUARE DISH, PAT SOME BUTTER OR MARGARINE ON TOP IF YOU LIKE. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO STEAM BAKE RIGHT AWAY, YOU CAN ALLOW THE RAISINS TO SOAK FOR AN HOUR TO SOFTEN THEM.

ADDING RAISINS TO THE PUDDING GIVES IT A TWIST... YOU MAY ADD SOME DRIED CRANBERRIES ALSO.

ADD SUGAR TO THE MIXTURE OF BREAD, MILK AND EGGS. ADJUST THE SWEETNESS.


SHRED LEFTOVER BREADS AND SOAK WITH MILK AND BEATEN EGGS.




THE PUDDI…

instant yeasts and active dry yeast in bread making

My first experience with yeast baking did not go well at first despite the many baking books i have in my collection( which were all wiped out by the typhoon Ondoy, sept 26, 2009). The most ridiculous thing is that in your attempt to proof the yeast, you actually just snuff the life out of it by using water that is too hot for the yeast to handle. So you throw it out and then try again. Later on, many years after, i found out from my teacher in class that i did not even have to do this, simply use tap water, add a teaspoon of sugar, then the yeast, stir and voila!!! Wait for the dough to bloom or froth and your done. This is if you are using active dry yeast. Instant means you simply dump it in the flour mix, no blooming necessary.

Shown here in these images, two types of yeasts, the active dry has to be bloomed first before using, then when the yeast froths, you can dump it into the mixing bowl.

The instant yeast on the other hand, is more convenient to use, i weigh it with the rest of…