Skip to main content

The Last of the Monay

I am going to miss this bread and hopefully since i managed to bring in two kilograms of 3rd class flour, i can make a couple of batches this Summer. I want to bang my head on the wall for leaving out the bread flour, my brother's box was over weight and it seemed to have been not much of a big deal to Cathay, so darn lucky. I hate thinking about it, i left at least 10 kilograms of Wellington from my last bread making class, i am pretty sure no one will dare use it.

I am back, my sniffling nose is gone, cough almost dried out although i still wake up in the middle of the night coughing, but it isn't as worst as before some two weeks ago. We went out to shop for groceries and met a Pinoy who stopped us while walking from TJ Maxx to Walmart and asked "excuse me, mga Pinoy kayo?".

Turns out, Jeffrey is from Florida, just moved in last week and is having a hard time adjusting. We all do.

Anyway, I have my bleached All Purpose so i can make my Mother and sister white Siopao, not the usual dirty off white we used to eat around here. I have some leftover bread flour from the Bulk Barn, still free from weevils mind you, the Spelt, Cracked Wheat, Kamut, Cornmeal all managed to stay pest free after two years. By golly, i hope my flours will suffer the same fate, wishful thinking i guess.

I use my Canadian All purpose for baking the breads because i am saving the bread flour for the Hard Monay seen here. This is the only sweet white flour based bread i shovel my small mouth, nothing else. I do eat Pizzas made from whole grain, and baguettes, etc., But no more dinner rolls or white loaf breads. I want to take care of my health really well from this year onwards, my latest check up was nerve wracking, so i promise to be a good girl again. Kinda ironic that i teach breads and pastries but that's exactly it, had i not perfected this craft, i would never be able to create my own style of breads, something you as an aspiring bread maker should all start from. Begin with the basics and branch out. I am already in the branching out stage, Spanish breads and Ensaimadas are baked in my kitchen for loved ones and as you know with my students.

This post is dedicated to this bread, the lone star of my gustatory obsession when it comes to carbs, (bad carbs to some). Oy! It's not like i eat it everyday right?




My ever so trusted 1998 4 sheeter oven, still at its finest. I will never exchange this for a Kitchen Aid oven.


I call it the Siksik Sensation, it is the makunat, chewy texture, yet melt in the mouth goodness that got me hooked on this bread. When i started teaching way back 2001, this was not part of my lessons. It was only when someone requested that i teach it around 2007 when i discovered how delicious it really is. Yum!!! Mind you, do not use your dough hook to make this, you can if you want to but add a bit more water to the really very stiff dough. My LA student Josefina broke two Kitchen Aids making this.

check out my weebly site for more baking images... Pandesal slideshow

Incidentally, if you are a Walking Dead fan over at AE, last Sunday's episode was like a Pinoy B movie at its worst. I mean the story and the directing was so sloppy, we end up discussing what and why this and that happened. It was like the director fell off his chair and made someone else did it so he can go home and watch tv. duh! I better tell them how bitterly disappointing this episode was, nothing at par to the quality of the episodes from the past, it was the episode from the twilight zone.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

3rd Class Flour, What's It All About

For starters i cannot make this Hard Monay if i did not bring any 3rd class flour or soft weak flour to New York. Once i ran out of 3rd class and tried Cake Flour, it turned bad, do not even think of using All Purpose, it will be soft but not chewy as this one made with yes, 3rd class indeed. So third class is hard to find here in the US if you will use that term. You have to say or look for soft wheat flour, that's it, not hard wheat flour, not cake or All purpose but something in between these two. It is easy to find in the Phil., just ask your local bakery suppliers and they know it is Tercera. Tercera is not for bread, bakers use it basically for cookies, cakes and other pastries, but we bakers know how to create bread recipes using part of this flour with the bread flour or hard wheat flour. It makes a softer version of any of your fave breads, with a cheaper price tag. Plus if i own a bakery, i get to use the third class for my cakes and cookies, lowering my food cost i…

HOW TO MAKE A PUDDING, PINOY STYLE

ANY LEFTOVER BREADS, DRIED BREADS AS LONG AS THEY HAVE NO MOLDS IN THEM, YOU CAN USE THESE TO MAKE YOUR HOMESTYLE PUDDING.


MOIST BUT NOT DENSE, I MAKE THIS FOR MY MOTHER SINCE SHE LIKES SOFT FOODS AND SHE CANNOT CHEW ON THE CRUSTY BREADS AND COOKIES I REGULARLY BAKE. GOOD THING WE HAVE LEFTOVERS!!!! NO NUTS PLEASE!!!!

A GOOD PUDDING IS MADE USING A BAIN MARIE, PLACE THE PUDDING PAN ON A LARGER BAKING PAN WITH WATER AT THE BOTTOM. STEAM BAKE FOR 40 MINUTES OR UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN.

DO NOT FORGET TO GREASE THE BAKING DISH OR THE PUDDING WILL STICK A LITTLE, YOU WANT NICE CLEAN CUTS...


THE PUDDING PLACED ON A SQUARE DISH, PAT SOME BUTTER OR MARGARINE ON TOP IF YOU LIKE. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO STEAM BAKE RIGHT AWAY, YOU CAN ALLOW THE RAISINS TO SOAK FOR AN HOUR TO SOFTEN THEM.

ADDING RAISINS TO THE PUDDING GIVES IT A TWIST... YOU MAY ADD SOME DRIED CRANBERRIES ALSO.

ADD SUGAR TO THE MIXTURE OF BREAD, MILK AND EGGS. ADJUST THE SWEETNESS.


SHRED LEFTOVER BREADS AND SOAK WITH MILK AND BEATEN EGGS.




THE PUDDI…

instant yeasts and active dry yeast in bread making

My first experience with yeast baking did not go well at first despite the many baking books i have in my collection( which were all wiped out by the typhoon Ondoy, sept 26, 2009). The most ridiculous thing is that in your attempt to proof the yeast, you actually just snuff the life out of it by using water that is too hot for the yeast to handle. So you throw it out and then try again. Later on, many years after, i found out from my teacher in class that i did not even have to do this, simply use tap water, add a teaspoon of sugar, then the yeast, stir and voila!!! Wait for the dough to bloom or froth and your done. This is if you are using active dry yeast. Instant means you simply dump it in the flour mix, no blooming necessary.

Shown here in these images, two types of yeasts, the active dry has to be bloomed first before using, then when the yeast froths, you can dump it into the mixing bowl.

The instant yeast on the other hand, is more convenient to use, i weigh it with the rest of…